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Tea, the ultimate infusion.

Enjoying a tea infusion is a delight for three of our main senses: sight, because its mixture with other fruits and spices gives the liquid a variety of beautiful and bright colours; smell, because, during its making, the heat and its vapours give off delicious and comforting scents, capable of taking us to remote places; and taste, because its flavour spectre is so wide that it can go from the most flavourful sweets to the most intense tarts, and even give hot, spiced or citric flavours.

The five main types of tea are clearly distinguished according to their processing:

White Tea: This tea comes from China and it owes its name to the white and silver villosity from the closed buds of the tea plant. White tea is obtained from the younger plant leaves, new buds from the shrub that haven’t yet oxidised and that, as they are protected from the sun, avoid chlorophyll formation, which gives it its original white colour. Its infusion has a soft yellow colour.

Green Tea: It’s the favourite infusion in Asian countries. It is called green tea because the leaves are taken from the plant when they have this colour, after which they are immediately dried and crushed after being picked. This type of tea has a fresher flavour than other varieties, reason why in these countries it’s usually served with no sweeteners. As opposed to what happens in Europe, in Asian countries this infusion is taken with food, not after. Some green tea varieties are: Matcha, Zhu cha, Sencha and Gyokuro.

Blue Tea: Also known as Oolong tea, this infusion has a medium degree of oxidisation, that is, it’s placed between black teas and green teas because its leaves are fermented for half as long as the latter.

Black Tea: This is the tea with the highest oxidisation, which gives its infusion a reddish and dark colour. Black tea is the most popular in Western countries, especially in the UK, where there is an almost official teatime. This is the most processed tea and also the one with the highest amount of theine. The size of its leaves determines its intensity. The most common variations of black tea are Earl Grey, Ceylon, Assam, Darjeeling and Sikkim.

Red Tea: Also known as Pu-erh, this is a tea that, as opposed to other teas that are usually drunk after harvesting, is drunk only after a long fermentation process that can last between 2 and 60 years in oak barrels. This process gives the leaves an intense coppery colour that it transfers to the infusion.

At Jurado you’ll find the most classic teas to delicious combinations of tea with fruit or spice flavours. Discover the properties and benefits of each one of them. Every season of the year and every moment of the day have their perfect infusion, let yourself be surprised.

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